Shark Management and Law

Saturday, March 11, 10:30am, Weinmann Hall, Room TBD

Sharks have a bad rap for being mindless eating machines, but in reality, humans are more dangerous to sharks than they are to humans. To combat the anthropogenic threats they face, shark conservation and management is governed by laws and policy at the regional, national, and even international level. Jason Adriance and Caroline Park will address shark management across these levels, and whether these laws are adequate.

Caroline Park, Deputy Section Chief with the Fisheries and Protected Resources Section of the National Oceanic

Caroline S. Park is a Deputy Section Chief with the Fisheries and Protected Resources Section of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Office of General Counsel, U.S. Department of Commerce.  She has been with NOAA since 2002.  In 2012, she conducted research on New Zealand’s commercial fisheries management through an Ian Axford Fellowship in Public Policy.  Prior to NOAA, Caroline was a fellow at the Institute for Public Representation at Georgetown University Law Center.  She also served as a trial attorney with the Environmental Crimes Section, U.S. Department of Justice.  She received a J.D. and L.L.M. from Georgetown and a B.A. from Stanford University.

Jason Adriance, Finfish Program Manager, Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries

Guyer Bogen (Moderator), 2016 Tulane Environmental Law Summit Speaker Chair and Third-Year Law Student at Tulane University Law School

Brought to you by: Tulane University Graduate Studies Student Association